Viewing entries tagged
Sterling Publishing

Comment

New Picture Book Releases from @SterlingPublishing! #childrensbooks

9781454921202 | $16.95 | Hardcover

9781454921202 | $16.95 | Hardcover

Laugh along as a story about a tree in the forest comes full circle, bringing three creatures along for a bumpy but fun ride.
— Kirkus

When Moose sees the inviting tree where Squirrel has built his nest, he rubs his itchy antlers against the trunk—and sets in motion a chain of comic catastrophes. Kids will love this adorable picture book, with its irresistible animal characters and rhythmic text that’s made for reading out loud.

9781454919797 | $16.95 | Hardcover

9781454919797 | $16.95 | Hardcover

Where does Koala belong? Find out, in this sweet story of friendship and family—with fun facts about marsupials thrown in.

It's Koala's first day at camp, and she thinks she's found her place in the Bear Cabin—until know-it-all Kangaroo comes along and tells Koala in no uncertain terms that she is not a bear. As Koala tries to find her place, alert readers will recognize clues about where Koala belongs. Using humor and fun illustrations, this engaging story will reel kids in and leave them with a satisfying ending.


9781454929888 | $19.95 | Hardcover

9781454929888 | $19.95 | Hardcover

Listen: the forest is calling. Take a quiet walk through the woods, where shadows fall in the darkness, eyes peek out, and some animals sleep while others run and leap. Simple, poetic text and intricate papercut illustrations introduce children to a deer, black rook, fox, rabbit, and many more beautiful creatures as they wait for morning—and spring—to come.


Comment

Comment

Sterling Publishing: Children's Book Reviews Round-Up

Sam Wu is still totally NOT scared. Even though he’s already demonstrated his bravery by conquering a ghost (Sam Wu Is Not Afraid of Ghosts, 2018), Sam somehow once again finds himself trying to shake the nickname “Scaredy-Cat Sam.” After an embarrassing incident during a school trip to the aquarium, he and his friends face a beach birthday party and the twin specters of swimming (turns out his brainy friend Bernard can’t swim) and sharks (obviously). He notes, in his characteristically wry way, that “apparently, bravery is something you have to prove over and over again.” This second installment, like Sam, seems anxious of venturing beyond the surf; it largely clings to the format of the first book, nearly act for act. Nonetheless, it should find its readers, who may find comfort and confidence in following Sam’s incremental growth. Additional time spent with Na-Na, Sam ‘s sharp and sassy grandmother, reveals more about Sam’s family’s Hong Kong origins and highlights a loving, realistic, intergenerational relationship. Foodies will enjoy the additional references to Chinese fare—one memorable scene finds Sam, white-skinned Bernard, and darker-skinned Zoe happily chewing on grilled squid. While Reed’s Na-Na isn’t a particularly compelling image of a Hong Kong grandma, readers will otherwise appreciate the illustrations’ big-eyed humor as well as the dynamic type styling, graphics, and page design. A sequel skittish of unchartered waters still finds its way.
— Kirkus Reviews
Mirabel is a shy mouse with lots of determination. Despite her nervousness she makes Valentine’s Day cards for her classmates. In spite of her trepidation, she slowly makes her way to school on the fateful day. Unbeknownst to her, the cards have fallen from a hole in her bag and have brightened the day of each person (animal) who picked one up—a lonely lady, construction workers, a busy papa, a jogger, a garbage man. Arriving at school with an empty bag Mirabel cried, “I’ve lost my Valentines!!” Hearing her cry, smiling folks return her cards and thanking her for sharing them, if only for a little while. Emboldened by unintentionally making new friends, Mirabel joins in the fun at party time. As she skips home from school, her pals slip more valentines into her bag. Lawler’s rhyming text is a pleasure to read. Using muted colors and plenty of detail, Mueller’s digital illustrations are warm and cozy with a small town feel. The opening endpapers depict Mirabel’s path to school and the folks she’ll encounter while the back pages depict those same folks exchanging their own valentines. VERDICT This sweetly inspiring story of a timid mouse stepping outside her comfort zone is a winner. Great for Valentine’s or any day.
— School Library Journal
Cocca-Leffler draws an easy metaphor between growing children and growing potted plants in this relatable story. El and Jo are the smallest students in their class, and they do everything together (“Even their names were short”). One spring, though, Jo starts to grow, just like the plants that the students will care for at home over the summer; neither El nor her plant, though, grow any taller. While Jo is away all summer, the girls exchange letters and El plants both of the flowers in the garden. Finally, Jo arrives home to find that both of the plants have bloomed—and she and El are the same height. Cocca-Leffler proffers a reassuring message to readers: no two growing up experiences are alike, and one develops at one’s own pace. A note on plant life cycles concludes.
— Publisher's Weekly
This picture book biography introduces young readers to the Hollywood legend famous for her beauty and the many hit movies in which she starred throughout the 1940s and 1950s, and her passion for science and technology. Lamarr’s zeal is conveyed superbly. Growing up in Austria in the 1920s, she wanted to understand how things worked. She took apart her toys to study their mechanisms and, during long walks with her father, explored subjects ranging from streetcars to the night sky. She also reenacted her favorite scenes from movies on a stage she built beneath her father’s desk. Wallmark brings Lamarr to life by including quotes from her subject. During World War II, Lamarr worked with another inventor on technology called frequency hopping, which is still in use today and allows users to send and receive secure cell phone messages and protect computers from hackers. The back matter includes a spread detailing frequency-hopping in more depth. Vibrant digital artwork expands upon the text by showcasing a handful of Lamarr’s other inventions and using period details to convey the golden era of Hollywood. VERDICT A must for both school and public libraries, especially where collections are looking to increase their STEM holdings and round out biography collections with women working in science.
— School Library Journal
9781454923817.jpg
In this debut picture book, Deenihan offers a charmingly literal rendition of the proverbial phrase “when life gives you lemons, make lemonade,” with a colorful and cute story of a child who gets an unwanted birthday gift from grandma: a lemon tree. Once her mischievous plots to rid herself of the tree fail, a fruitful alternative arises: nurture the tree to make lemonade to sell in order to get what she really wants. In addition to the comical efforts of the girl, this playful picture book showcases the concept of delayed gratification. The girl truly has to wait for good things to come to fruition, and once they do, she makes some surprising choices (perhaps just what Grandma wanted). These concepts are enhanced by the eyecatching colors, bold cartoon figures with deeply expressive faces, and diverse cast of characters in Rocha’s illustrations, which are filled with plenty of fun background details to pore over. A nice complement to Matt de la Peña’s Last Stop on Market Street (2015) or Katherine Pryor’s Zora’s Zucchini (2015).
— Booklist
A girl discovers that her passions can help her make sense of a difficult skill. Bug is a girl who loves drawing bugs more than anything else, “especially math.” When her teacher, Mrs. Muskie, announces that they will go to the science museum, which has a cool bug room, if the class performs well on the upcoming math test, Bug takes the challenge seriously. She goes to a field to study but, frustratingly, finds herself continually distracted by new bugs to draw. After several failed attempts, she realizes that her doodles hold the visual key to understanding the math problems: adding spots on a butterfly’s wings and subtracting the number of ants that drop their seeds. Notably, Koontz acknowledges her young character’s agency by having Bug independently come to this revelation and later calmly assist Mrs. Muskie when Bug’s “lucky crickets” (stashed in her lunchbox to help with the test) get in her hair. The latter moment offers a spot of fun for Bug’s multiracial classmates. Pale-skinned Bug is precocious with her short, light-brown hair, rolled-up pants, and antenna headband; Mrs. Muskie has brown skin and a “cloud of curly hair.” Proud’s illustrations in pencil and acrylic take on the style of doodles themselves, with pronounced, colored outlines and circular eyes for characters and bugs alike. The crawling critters appear charming instead of off-putting. A respectful boost of encouragement for young minds that may be struggling with school.
— Kirkus Reviews
9781454922926.jpg
A picture-book celebration of individuality and diversity. Helig and Hembrook’s text opens with the lines, “In all the world over, / this much is true: / You’re somebody special. / There’s only one you.” The art depicts a white-appearing child with red pigtails, first on the floor, drawing, beside a big dog, then getting dressed as the dog sits on the bed and a woman, also white, peeks in. The next scene depicted in the digital, car toon-style art shows the child hugging the woman and about to get on a school bus with a gaggle of diverse children with varying skin tones, hair textures and colors, and visible disabilities (one child wears a hearing aid, another wears glasses, a third uses a forearm crutch, and a fourth uses a wheelchair). As the rhyming text continues, it celebrates the diversity of these children not just in terms of their identities, but by commenting on their personalities, their talents, and ultimately their families. At book’s end, the first child is revealed to have two moms when they both pick her up at the end of the school day, the family dog in tow. “Families are families, / but soon you will find / that each can be different— / a ‘best for them’ kind,” reads the accompanying, inclusive text. Affirming and welcome.
— Kirkus Reviews
9781454921202.jpg
A bonanza of possibilities opens up for Moose, Bear, and Squirrel, three forest companions. There are two outcomes, one unremarkable and the other outlandish, for each of many causes, starting with the first page of the story. “When a tree grows,” it can become either a “scratching post for Moose’s itchy antlers,” or it can crash and fall, waking up Bear, who can do one of two things. And so it continues, as Moose encounters a truck, which leads Squirrel to set off for the city for a “job at Nifty Nuts as a quality control inspector.” Or not, which could lead to either a career as an actor or to his missing Moose and home. Which leads to an awesome “Welcome Home party,” which leads to—and the book concludes with—an even more awesome Edenic forest setting for reading, lounging, and just being one’s animal self. The text and the colorful digital illustrations work together in this silly but entertaining tale. Each verso page is busily filled with action and onomatopoeia while the corresponding recto page highlights one of the characters. The bottom right of this page features an image of a turned-up flap and a large “OR…” providing quick pacing for each far-fetched but why-not outcome. Laugh along as a story about a tree in the forest comes full circle, bringing three creatures along for a bumpy but fun ride.
— Kirkus Reviews

Comment

Comment

Watch the Book Trailer for Animal Gas by Bryan Ballinger

Watch the hilarious book trailer for Sterling Publishing's awesome kid's book ANIMAL GAS (9781454916161) written and illustrated by Bryan Ballinger. 


BOOK SUMMARY

Every kid knows that nothing's funnier than a fart joke. And it's also a universal truth (and mysterious fact) that people don't mind the smell of their own farts. Animal Gas explores this hilarious concept through a parade of animals who describe why they don't think their own farts stink—against the truth about how they REALLY smell!

Sterling Publishing 
Animal Gas
Bryan Ballinger
9781454916161
$14.95 CDN
 

 

Comment

POETRY MONTH! Weekly Picks

9781771660365_cover_coverbookpage

This week, bpNichol's poetic legacy, Japanese forms, Earle Birney's essential readings and poetry for kids! Theseus by bpNichol, THESEUS is an important text that adds considerable gravitas to Nichol's poetic legacy, and the unique partnership between the two authors allows Nichol's words to be extended beyond the grave. "bpNichol was, and still is, the essential poet for so many of us." – Michael Ondaatje

BookThug ISBN 9781771660365 $15.00

41XzYmjgRjL._SL500_AA300_

Shouting Your Name Down A Well by David McFadden, explores the Japanese forms of haiku and tankas. This is the first full-length collection of his work in those forms. The 400 or so poems in this collection create a mesmerizing overview of his life and his philosophy.

Mansfield Press ISBN 9781771260411 $20.00

9780889843738

The Essential Earle Birney by Earle Birney, presents a wide-ranging selection of the celebrated Canadian poet's most memorable verse.

The Porcupine's Quill ISBN 9780889843738 $14.95

51Mag6KIzEL._SL500_AA300_

Signs of Subversive Innocents by Cora Sire, travels the depth of human experience from the celebratory to the delusional. This debut collection by Cora Sir tells of characters and realms, both distant and familiar, with vibrant intensity and lyricism.

Signature Editions ISBN 9781927426388 $14.95

9781894987837_p0_v1_s260x420

Everyone is CO2 by David James Brock, debut poetry collection from the internationally acclaimed librettist and playwright. His subject matter is wide ranging, addressing the things that influence our private mythologies, from television to space exploration, from heavy metal to the epic of Gilgamesh.

Wolsak and Wynn Publishers Ltd. ISBN 9781894987837 $18.00

FOR THE KIDS...

9781419710391

Hope is a Ferris Wheel by Robin Herrera, Moving to a new town has made it difficult for Star to make friends, when her classmates tease her because of where she lives and because of her layered blue hair. But when Star starts a poetry club, she develops a love of Emily Dickinson and, through Dickinson’s poetry, learns some important lessons about herself and comes to terms with her hopes for the future. "Well-constructed, thought-provoking and appealing, this first effort bodes well for the author’s future."-Kirkus Reviews

Abrams Books ISBN 9781419710391 $18.95

9781454902881M

Poetry for Young People: Robert Frost, stunning celebration of his best-loved work includes over 25 poems, including “Mending Wall,” “Birches” and, of course, “The Road Not Taken.” Henri Sorensen's gorgeous images perfectly complement each verse.

Sterling Publishing ISBN 9781454902881 $15.95

A Study In Scarlet : A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Ian Edginton and I.N.J. Culbard. STERLING, $19.50 (9781402770821)

If, like myself, you are pining for the return of everyone’s favourite mystery solving duo in the third series of the BBC’s SHERLOCK, the wait may be getting to you. Luckily for us there are ways to temper the sense of withdrawal we’re feeling. One way is to turn to the original stories but not every television viewer will go in for that. If only there was a way to consume the adventures of Watson and Holmes in a form as visual and engaging as the series we all love without having to travel forward in time (It doesn’t work; I’ve tried).

Enter: A Study in Scarlet: A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel brought to us by Sterling Publishing. This book is every bit as visual and engaging as SHERLOCK but pays closer attention to the original stories. It is a reader’s chance to get Sherlock Holmes’ origin story very close to the way it was originally intended but in a beautifully drawn imagining courtesy of artist I.N.J. Culbard. Ian Edginton’s attention to detail in the writing is also wonderful and many panels seem to have jumped right out of the pages of the original novel.

Comic book fans with no interest in Holmes will also find themselves lost in this book as it provides them with a much needed break from the typical superhero narratives: a break which they might not realize they need until they’ve taken it. A perfect blending of classic fiction and the graphic novel, this book could be the jumping off point for many comic fans to find a love of classic literature or, conversely, for fans of classic literature to find a love of comic books.

For readers who enjoy this and are eager for more, it will come as good news that, besides two more Shherlock Holmes entries, Sterling has given the graphic novel treatment to classics like Jekyl and Hyde, A Tale of Two Cities, and even Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment.

Happy Reading!

Book Trailer for BORN FROM THE HEART | Sterling Publishing

Here's the lovely book trailer for Born from the Heart (9781454911449):

Born from the Heart

by: Berta Serrano, illustrated by Alfonso Serrano

“Rose dreamed of her baby every night . . . She couldn't wait to share hugs and giggles.” A mother's love comes from the heart, from the desire to embrace and nurture a child—whether or not she gave birth to that baby. This poetic and magical parable celebrates the richness of family as Rose and Charlie embark on the search for the child they so desperately want. As Rose's dream gets closer to coming true, her heart grows and grows . . . until it bursts with happiness, laughter, and wonder when she finally kisses the beautiful face of her new baby.

First time author Berta Serrano and her brother Alfonso Serrano are the author-illustrator team behind this warm and quirky love letter for Berta's adopted son.

Read more at: www.sterlingpublishing.com

 Born from the Heart

Publisher: Sterling Children's Books Published: October 2013 Age range: 3 upwards 40 pages ISBN: 9781454911449 $15.95 Canadian