NEW RELEASES

 9783740802578

9783740802578

Toronto, from its humble beginning as Muddy York, has emerged as an exemplary, world-class city. As the 4th largest urban area in North America, it is a treasure trove of obscure, trend-setting Canadian places. Ranked as one of the world's leading places to live, it represents home to almost 20% of Canada's population. Toronto has become the nation's capital of business, culture, sports and entertainment. A place where you can take in the best of all sports, especially hockey, live music, art, and an award-winning culinary scene, all in a weekend. The city's strength and roots come from its diverse population. Toronto takes from its indigenous and British past, a welcoming and collaborative twist on this dynamic multicultural city.

Toronto has been described as a city within a green space. Hike inner city trails along the many ravines. Ride in a canoe or skate along the water's edges. Take the longest streetcar ride in North America through flourishing neighborhoods, full of hidden gems to discover. Find the small artisanal ice creameries, wander the graffiti alleys, or make music at a karaoke cocktail lounge. Explore the allure of the 6ix, with 111 Places in Toronto That You Must Not Miss.

 9781851498932

9781851498932

Many of his photographs are chronicled in the new book, aptly titled Dylan by Schatzberg, which features a treasure trove of both famed and rare images of the icon.
— Billboard
Jerry Schatzberg shot everybody who was anybody in the ’60s, from Hendrix to Castro, and went on to make great movies. But his photographs of Dylan are in a class by themselves.
— The Daily Beast

In 1965, photographer Jerry Schatzberg, already well-established in the field due to his fashion and portrait photography for various publications, such as Vogue, Esquire and Life, listened to Bob Dylan for the first time. He had been hearing about the singer for close to three years; two friends were especially dogged and would ask him every time they spoke if he had heard the music yet. Finally, feeling obligated to them for their persistency, he listened and understood immediately why Dylan was inspiring such passionate excitement. Shortly thereafter, Schatzberg was photographing a job in his studio and had some fortuitous company. Famed music journalist Al Aronowitz and disc jockey Scott Ross were discussing Dylan and a recent performance they had seen of his. Half listening to their conversation, he volunteered that he'd like to photograph the singer if given the chance. Dylan's new wife (one of the friends mentioned above) called the following day and gave him an open invitation to the studio where he was currently recording 'Highway 61 Revisited'. Excited and curious, Schatzberg set off the very next day for the studio, exactly six days after the seminal Newport Folk Festival set where Dylan went electric and was collectively booed. Schatzberg received a warm welcome from the singer, who immediately sat him down to listen to what he had been recording that day. Dylan gave him free rein of the studio once he started shooting and the images that emerged from that day make obvious the comfortable and relaxed atmosphere that was already brewing between photographer and subject. Considering Dylan's almost-universal dislike of journalists (and by extension photographers), this was a completely unprecedented situation, one that Schatzberg took seriously.

That almost-instant trust and rapport quickly grew into a friendship and they are part of the reason Schatzberg's sittings with Dylan work so successfully and are so important. Dylan is relaxed, he's funny, he takes the props that the photographer gives him and has fun with them - he's obviously not taking himself too seriously. Working and socializing together, Schatzberg would eventually do nine more photo shoots with Dylan from 1965-6, arguably the singer's most creative period, and capture the (now) Nobel laureate during one of the most pivotal moments in music history. Part of their uniqueness is their basic broad range of intimate and public locations: music and photography studios, live performances and street portraits. But more than that, each session (including the one for possibly his greatest album, 'Blonde on Blonde') says something different about Dylan, the man and the musician, and manages to perfectly capture the many facets of one of the most unique, complex and mysterious individuals of all time.

 9781851498918

9781851498918

Terry O'Neill is one of the greatest living photographers today, with work displayed and exhibited at first-class museums and fine-art galleries worldwide. His iconic images of Frank Sinatra, The Beatles, Brigitte Bardot, Faye Dunaway, and David Bowie - to name but a few - are instantly recognisable across the globe. Now, for the first time, O'Neill selects a range of images from his extensive archive of "vintage prints", which will surprise and delight collectors and photography lovers alike.

Long before the age of digital, photographers would send physical prints to the papers and magazines. These prints were passed around, handled by many, stamped on the back, and often times captioned. After use, the prints were either filed away, thrown out or - for the lucky few - sent back to the photographer or their photo agencies.

At the dawn of the 1960s, when O'Neill's career began, physical prints were the norm. Terry kept as many as he could that were sent back to him. "I just kept everything," he says. "I don't know why. Back then, there wasn't really a reason to keep them. Photos were used straight away and then I just moved on to the next assignment. No one was thinking these would be worth anything down the line, let alone fifty years later."

This book collects hundreds of these rare images, a true must for Terry's fans and photography collectors.

 9781851499120

9781851499120

There are no rules, and even less justice. Death takes everyone without discrimination. Sometimes it is accidental - like Signorelli, who fell from scaffolding. Sometimes it is expected, as with the diabetic Cezanne, who wrote "I am old, sick, and I swore to die while painting". But often, researching a painter's death is an easier task than determining which of their works is truly their 'last'. Paintings tend to be dated by year and not month, inciting much debate among art historians. This book embraces this ambiguity, studying 100 examples of works that lay completed for several years, or were left unfinished on the easel, or were finished post-mortem by a friend's grieving hand.

The Last Painting collects 100 terminal paintings from 100 artists, including Dalí, Manet, Toulouse-Lautrec, Degas, Goya, Pollock, Rembrandt, Dix, Bonnard, Titien, and many more. Each picture gives us a glimpse into the painter's mind. Did they know death was coming? Did they paint with denial, or acceptance? Did they return to a favourite subject, or decide to embark on a new, original project while they still had time? A poetic and thought-provoking book, The Last Painting is a sensitive exploration of the relationship between art and death.

COMING SOON

 9781851499144

9781851499144

On the morning of Thursday, September 12, 1963, noted fashion photographer Norman Parkinson was to photograph a young pop group from Liverpool. Earlier that year, the band had exploded onto the scene - releasing the first of eleven (out of twelve) studio albums that would reach number one on the charts. That band was The Beatles. The album had been 'Please Please Me', it was still number one and it would stay at number one for thirty weeks. Parkinson, already established as Britain's most famous photographer, had a date with its new greatest band.

Revealing, insightful and funny this collection of photos captures The Beatles near the start of their spectacular career. Their creativity is plain to see in these photos which have become some of the most important in the extensive Beatles catalogue.

Now, ACC Editions, in collaboration with The Norman Parkinson Archive and Iconic Images, presents this historic meeting between a new music group and one of the greatest photographers of the 20th century. Covering nearly 30 rolls of film, these images of The Beatles at the President Hotel in Bloomsbury and famed Abbey Road Studios, offer a rare insight of the making of an iconic band.

BACKLIST HIGHLIGHT

 9782812310737

9782812310737

In the middle of the twentieth century, Pierre Desfontaines, cousin of Louis Ernest Ladurée, created the first Ladurée macaron by having the genius to stick two macaron cookies together and fill them with a flavorful ganache. Ever since then, the preparation has stayed the same. Each season Ladurée celebrates this little round cake that's crispy outside and soft inside, a perfect balance of aromas and textures, by creating new flavors. Each year the palette of flavors and colors grows, from the classic chocolate or raspberry to festive macarons, exotic flavours for certain destinations, fashion designers, perfumes etc.

This book presents, for the first time, each of the eighty Ladurée macarons, their aromas, inspirations, trend books and of course all of the recipes to make them at home.At the end of the book there is a practical, step-by-step section to show exactly how Ladurée's chefs make the cookies and the ganache fillings so you can be sure to succeed in making them too.

Contents: Introduction: A little history of the macaron; 80 Macarons: flavour by flavour, a trend book, inspirations and recipes for each; 1. Classic macarons (vanilla, café, chocolate, lemon etc); 2. Nomad macarons (created for specific destinations); 3. Festive macarons (Christmas, Easter etc); 4. Precious macarons (gold, silver, copper etc); 5. Incredible macarons (violet, lemon-lime etc); 6. Designer's macarons (berry for Christian Lacroix, fig-date for Christian Louboutin, rose-ginger for John Galliano, bubble-gum for Alber Elbaz etc); Step-by-step photographs and instructions for making the biscuits and ganache fillings at home.

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