The Globe & Mail has released their list of the most anticipated books of fall 2017. Books editor Mark Medley previews the titles – from debut authors to former prizewinners to perennial bestsellers – that should keep you busy reading for the rest of the year! Read more here: www.theglobeandmail.com

The Original Face By Guillaume Morrisette

9781550654783 || $19.95. Paperback

9781550654783 || $19.95. Paperback

A novel about the gig economy.

Twenty-nine-year-old Daniel is an under-employed internet artist who's struggling as much with money and inspiration as he is in his relationship with Grace. Against a backdrop of a digital economy that rewards online platforms instead of content creators, with climate-change anxiety hanging in the air, the resolutely contemporary Morissette immerses readers into a year of modern love, as Daniel and Grace navigate their aspirations, insecurities and ambitions amidst a culture obsessed with selfies and identity.

A fresh and imaginative critical examination of work and life in the 21st century by the author of the "cultishly popular" New Tab.

Blood Fable By Oisín Currin

9781771662949 || $20.00 Paperback

9781771662949 || $20.00 Paperback

Blood Fable--the new work of fiction from Oisín Curran--is a Jules Verne-esque fantastical tale filled with Back-to-the-Land ideology and American Zen Buddhism.

In 1980, New Pond, a utopian Buddhist community on the coast of Maine is on the verge of collapse. New Pond's charismatic leader demands complete adherence to his authority, and slowly, his followers come to the realization that they've been exploited for too long. The eleven-year-old son of one of those adherents is dimly aware of the concerns of the adult world. Yet his imagination provides a refuge both from the difficulties of his parents' lives--including his mother's newly discovered cancer--and from the boredom and casual brutality of school.

To distract his parents and himself from their collective troubles, the boy claims to remember his own life before birth--an epic tale about the search for a lost city made up of the boy's own experiences refracted through the lens of the adventure stories he loves. As the world around them falls apart, the boy and his parents find that his strange story often seems to predict the events taking place in the world around them.

Malagash By Joey Comeau

9781770414075 || $15.95. Paperback

9781770414075 || $15.95. Paperback

A precisely crafted, darkly humorous portrait of a family in mourning.

Sunday’s father is dying of cancer. They’ve come home to Malagash, on the north shore of Nova Scotia, so he can die where he grew up. Her mother and her brother are both devastated. But devastated isn’t good enough. Devastated doesn’t fix anything. Sunday has a plan. 

She’s started recording everything her father says. His boring stories. His stupid jokes. Everything. She’s recording every single “I love you” right alongside every “Could we turn the heat up in here?” It’s all important. 

Because Sunday is writing a computer virus. A computer virus that will live secretly on the hard drives of millions of people all over the world. A computer virus that will think her father’s thoughts and say her father’s words. She has thousands of lines of code to write. Cryptography to understand. Exploits to test. She doesn’t have time to be sad. Her father is going to live forever.

The Prisoner and the Chaplain By Michelle Berry

9781928088431 || $20.00 Paperback

9781928088431 || $20.00 Paperback

What if prison was the only world that existed for you now and everything else was a story? What if you weren't sure if you were guilty but wanted forgiveness in any form? 

The Prisoner and the Chaplain is about two men; one man awaiting execution, the other man listening to his story. As the hours drain away, the chaplain must decide if the prisoner's story is an off-the-cuff confession or a last bid for salvation. As the chaplain listens he realizes a life has many stories, and he has his own story to tell?a last-ditch plea for forgiveness told to someone who will never be able to repeat it. Each man is guilty in his own way, and their stories have led them to the same room, a room that only one of them will leave alive. If you had only twelve hours left to live, what would you have to say?

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